Our History and Vision

Frontispiece, A Century of Judaism (1930)Since its founding in 1825, during the presidency of John Quincy Adams, Congregation B’nai Jeshurun has been a leading force in New York Jewry and has been closely involved in the civic and national communities. The 32 synagogue founders were a group of mostly Ashkenazic members of the Spanish-Portuguese Congregation Shearith Israel in Lower Manhattan. They wished to “promote the strict keeping of their faith,” to introduce “less formal worship with time set aside for explanations and instruction, without a permanent leader, and with no distinctions made among the members,” and to conduct services “according to German and Polish minhag [custom].”1 The spirit that moved these founders was the spirit of the American Revolution: democracy, freedom, diversity, informality, and non-elitism.

Elm Street Synagogue - B'nai JeshurunThe new congregation—the second in New York City and the ninth in the nation—began holding services in temporary facilities at 533 Pearl Street and then moved northward, with the general trend of the city’s Jewish population, to Elm Street, Greene Street, 34th Street, Madison Avenue and 64th Street, and then, in 1918, to its present home at 88th Street between Broadway and West End Avenue. The congregation flourished in its beautiful new space for more than 50 years under the leadership of Rabbi Israel Goldstein. This was a period when B’nai Jeshurun continued its outreach to the less fortunate in the city and supported the establishment of the State of Israel. The synagogue was a spiritual and social center for congregants. Dr. Chaim Weizmann spoke at BJ, as did Eleanor Roosevelt,  Martin Luther King Jr., and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel.

“A Jew does not believe alone; he or she believes with the community of Israel; and shares an insight of three thousand years of Jewish history. All generations are present in every generation. The community of Israel lives in every Jew. Every Jew, and the individual Jew, can survive only through intimate attachment to involvement in the community.” — Abraham Joshua Heschel, The Insecurity of Freedom

In the 1970s B’nai Jeshurun’s membership began to dwindle. That trend was reversed with the arrival of Rabbi Marshall T. Meyer from Buenos Aires in 1985. Setting up his “office” with a card table, a pay phone, and a roll of quarters, Rabbi Meyer began attracting many people with his impassioned Judaism, blending social activism, spirited musical worship, and a vision of an open and inclusive community. The vision he articulated then remains the same: Congregation B’nai Jeshurun believes that a community synagogue that responds to the authentic questions of life, death, love, anxiety, longing, and the search for meaning can once again attract Jews—families and individuals—if it is willing to grapple with the great issues of life.

The following year, Rabbi J. Rolando Matalon, who had been a student of Marshall’s in Argentina, joined him in leading the congregation. Soon there were swelling crowds at Friday night services, alive with meaningful prayer, joy, and dancing. Ari Priven, another student of Marshall’s from Argentina, came to BJ in 1989 as hazzan. In 1995, following Rabbi Meyer’s untimely death in 1993, Rabbi Marcelo Bronstein, yet another of his students, joined Rabbi Matalon in leading the congregation. In 2001, Rabbi Felicia Sol, who had been the Family and Youth Director and a Marshall T. Meyer Rabbinic Fellow, joined her teachers in their rabbinic partnership, becoming the congregation’s first woman rabbi. Under the leadership of the Rabbis, Hazzan, and numerous community leaders, a small, dying congregation with a proud history was transformed into a vibrant, inclusive, participatory community of almost 2,000 households. The congregation’s vital history continues to be tied to its sacred space and to the visionary leadership of its leaders, with many new chapters to be written.

Our Vision

Rabbis Matalon and MeyerIn our day, when our world is drifting in the direction of violence, hopelessness, and fear, making us uncomfortable, angry or despairing, we reach within the wellsprings of Jewish wisdom to present a compelling vision. We strive to meet the challenges of the present and to remain relevant in the search for justice, understanding, and peace. We draw inspiration from the great teachers of our tradition who embodied and articulated some of Judaism’s deepest and most cherished values: the kinship of humanity, love, responsibility, justice, and peace. We believe in the power of each person to change his or her individual reality. We believe in the power of community to change the world in which we live. We know that our lives are of consequence and that what we say and what we do matter. B’nai Jeshurun is our spiritual home and a source of strength that has helped us to deepen our relationship to God and our tradition though prayer, learning, and the commitment to each other and our world.

Our Mission

B’nai Jeshurun is a passionate Jewish community that inspires spiritual searching, lifts the soul, challenges the mind, and requires social responsibility and action. We strive to experience and express God’s presence as we study, pray, and serve together. We are unified yet diverse and explore the living tension between tradition and progress. We carry out deeds of loving-kindness, foster a meaningful relationship with Israel, and participate in serious dialogue and collaboration with Jewish people and people of other faiths to heal the world. We welcome you to study, pray, and serve with us.

  1. Sarna, Jonathan D, American Judaism: A History; Yale University Press, 2004.